Driving diversity in NZ leadership

15 Apr, 2019
 
Agnes Naera
Agnes Naera joins the board of Global Women

Agnes Naera says she is "humbled, privileged and very excited" at her recent appointment to the board of Global Women.

The long-serving AUT staff member is currently the director of student, business and community partnerships for AUT's Faculty of Business, Economics and Law.

"I felt humbled, privileged and very excited by the opportunity to sit in the shadow of the other board members, who each have a remarkable record of leadership, entrepreneurship, corporate governance and service, while drawing on the knowledge, experience and wisdom from the wider network and associates to enhance our collective impact," she said.

Global Women is a collaboration of New Zealand's most influential women leaders, with a mission to catalyse New Zealand’s social and economic success by championing diversity and inclusion.

Agnes’ journey began with her attending the Global Women Breakthrough Leaders Programme (BTLP) in 2012. The programme is a journey of discovery, learning and deep development for 30 women each year.

The highlight for Agnes was the immersive experience that has forged meaningful relationships with senior leaders in the corporate sector.

As an alumna Agnes was active in supporting the ambitions of the organisation, including interviewing Māori and Pacific BTLP applicants, acting as a spokesperson at various events, serving as a judge for the Deloitte Top 200 - Diversity Inclusion Awards and more recently being part of the organising committee for the upcoming Global Women Annual Hui to be hosted in Christchurch.

The chair of Global Women, Vanessa Stoddart, said the board felt “very privileged to have Agnes join to contribute her experience, skills, influence, energy and passion to a cause so fundamental to New Zealand’s future success”.

As she moves forward, Agnes looks to the wise words of the late Sir James Henare: "He tāwhiti ke tō koutou haerenga, ki te kore haere tōnu.  He tino nui rawa ō koutou mahi, kia kore mahi tōnu. (We have come too far, not to go further, we have done too much not to do more)."